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I think they're worth it for a couple of reasons. If you never plan on upgrading brakes or serious HP, then SS lines are a cheap and fairly easy mod. They don't allow expansion of the lines when you apply the brakes, so you get a quicker response from your braking. I think they're a great safety mod, too. Never can have enough braking power... :thumbsup: :shiftdrive:
 

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If you decide to install them, then I would recommend asking a friend for help. I have done the install on my previous car (WRX) and also on my 240. The install really isn't that hard. Unless you strip one of the bolts. That happened with the fronts on my WRX and also on the front driver side on my 240sx.
Jack car up and place on jack stands. Take wheels off. I would recommend to spray them down with PB Break Loose. If you have flared wrenches then they are recommended for the install. It was a 10mm for the 240sx. When taking off the lines you will have brake fulid spill so get some news paper or a drip pan. I took the C-clip off first. Then use a wrench to hold the bottom of the brake line. Then use the flared wrench to undue the bolt on the hard line. If you start to feel the bolt stripping, then use a hammer and tap the wrench acouple of times. Then take the banjo bolt off connected to the caliper. Install the new lines. Make sure you use a washer on top and bottom of the banjo bolts. Reinstall the c-clip. I am not sure of the tourqe specs. I just made sure they are really snug. When you bleed the brakes make sure you start from the furthest point from the brake master cylinder. So start at the passenger rear wheel, driver wheel wheel, passenger front, and then driver front. I got Goodridge lines. I know stop tech makes them also.
 

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I have not been able to drive it yet. My master cylinder was leaking after the install. I think there was too much pressure for the old master clyinder. I am also installing bushings. O the PAIN!
 

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great investment.

i think the biggest pain about installing them is bleeding them so that there are no air bubbles.
 

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Wow, this sounds like a better investment than I was even originally thinking. I just use my brakes for street and I don't track, but it would be really nice to know that they are going to have more response and hold up longer if I need them to. These might be especially nice once I upgrade my pads and rotors.

So what are the best lines to go with that will bolt up to the stock non-brembo brakes?

When I was installing my springs I started thinking about this mod. My friend and I were actually wondering why the brake lines were so small and crappy.
 

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Yeah, I would like to do pads/fluid/lines and maybe rotors sometime next year when my OEM pads wear out. I can bleed fluid, and have changed many brakes/caliper/lines, etc, but how do you swap fluid? Do you have to buy a ludicrous amount of the new stuff to flush out the old, or can you live with some old fluid in your lines?

I have noticed even on the roads somtimes my pads heat up FAST, I have even gotten them smoking once. I would b a good candidate for better brakes. But I dont track it, so I dont want to spend 3k on them yet.
 

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Smoking? That doesn't sound good.

While we're on the topic: How long are our stock pads and rotors supposed to last?
 

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No, it did not look or smell good either. It only lasted a few seconds. But they are brand new OEM pads, and had maybe 3200 miles on them. It was probably because I went from 100-0 as fast as I could. They stop pretty good. I have a feeling I will need new pads by 10k miles.
 

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mynismo.com has a stop tech kit for the non-brembo. It has lines, rotors, pads, and fluid. 2 bottles of fluid should be plenty. It should take you at most 3 hours for all that. All you need are acouple of wrenches and some sockets for the install. You can go to any auto parts store and they sell a clear tube you put over the bleeder nipple and you put the other end in a bottle. This way you won't have brake fluid going everywhere. Make sure you don't get the brake fluid on the paint. Also don't let the caliper hang just on the lines.
 

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Originally posted by Jung918@Dec 8 2004, 12:56 AM
When you bleed the brakes make sure you start from the furthest point from the brake master cylinder. So start at the passenger rear wheel, driver wheel wheel, passenger front, and then driver front. I got Goodridge lines. I know stop tech makes them also.

This may be the incorrect bleeding procedure for the Z. I may be wrong, but I remember reading before my brake job that you first do the drivers rear, then the passenger front, then the passenger rear, then the drivers front. Anyway, I understand the theory for the bleeding and distance from the mastger cylinder, but the Z has the computer system ABS in place. I'll check my manuals on this, but someone should post an official brake bleeding procedure for the Z. I am from the my350z forum and there is an endless amount of information there. Reading here to see if I miss anything not discussed over there.

At any rate, good luck with the brake job. Just take your time and be patient when bleeding. At the track, you don't want to be second-guessing yourself when you decellerate from 110 to 30 when going in a sharp turn bordered with a cement wall!!!!
 

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<span style="color:darkblue">From the 2004 Service Manual:

Bleeding Brake System
CAUTION:
While bleeding, pay attention to master cylinder fluid level.
1. Turn the ignition switch to the OFF position.
2. Connect a vinyl tube to the rear right bleed valve.
3. Fully depress brake pedal 4 to 5 times.
4. With the brake pedal depressed, loosen the bleed valve to let the air out, and then tighten it immediately.
5. Repeat steps 3, 4 until no more air comes out.
6. Tighten the bleed valve to the specified torque.
7. In steps 2 to 6 below, with the master cylinder reservoir tank filled at least half way, bleed air from the front left, rear left, and front right tires, in that order.
So it's rear right (passenger), front left (driver), rear left (driver), front right (passenger)</span>
 

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DiRN,

Thanks......I knew that it wasn't just work your way to the MC. I will change my brake fluid again before going to Laguna Seca and hopefully tracking. I didn't mean to call anyone on their errors, but wanted the correct procedure to be posted. When I changed my brakes, I had an issue with the bleeding and the pedal kept going to the floor. I finally posted somewhere and they mentioned the proper procedure.

Thanks again for the proper procedure,
Steve
 

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Oh yeah, no problem. When you mentioned someone should post the official procedure, I just opened up the manual and did a quick copy/paste. And since I have to install my SS lines sometime this winter, it's good to have looked it up!

:DiRN:
 
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