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This is the best Z site I have seen so far and I have seen a few. I have a G35 Coupe 6MT --I love the car but I need more
I am trying to make up my mind between going the NA route or slammin a jammin FI package on my VQ. So far Im thinking Procharger for ease of installation and possible removal or Vortech. That APS Kit has me droolin too but I think I would want to build my engine internals up a bit and then it gets too expensive. I have til spring to make up my mind. Let me know what you think the best mods are for:
-value
-bang for buck
-reliability

also that HKS S/C has me lookin.
 

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I noticed that he was selling I just have to synch something like that when Im in buying mode
no cash right now but the procharger has my eye
 

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Originally posted by badmammajamma@Oct 8 2004, 11:09 AM
I'll be back in a week we are going to Europe gotta check the autobahn they say it has no limit-

Have fun over there and test out to see about the no speed limit thing
 

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<span style="color:darkblue">
We need some pics.

Oh, by the way, have fun on the Autobahn!</span>
 

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welcome aboard!! i think that ether way you will be happy and it really is gonna come down to how much you wanna spend. i would go with the turbo'scause they sound amazing and the power they make is sick, however though the SC will give you the linear power band
 

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Originally posted by badmammajamma@Oct 8 2004, 01:09 PM
I'll be back in a week we are going to Europe gotta check the autobahn they say it has no limit-

Actually when we were in Germany there WAS a speed limit on the autobahn....i forget what it was but it was in km's...

*edit*

Here is the skinny:

BERLIN, April 27, 2000 - In an effort to reduce pollution and emissions from cars, German Environment Minister Juergen Trittin has called for stricter speed limits on the country's motorways.
Reuters reported that the ecologist Greens, who include Trittin and the Social Democrats, have demanded for quite some time that the speed limit be reduced to 100 kph (60 mph) on the autobahns.

According to the article, speed limits ranging from 60 kph (38 mph) to 130 kph (80 mph) are enforced on 75 percent of Germany's autobahn network. The remaining 7,300 kilometers (4,536 miles) however, have no speed limit allowing some cars to drive over 240 kph (150 mph).

Under the Kyoto Protocol, Germany has agreed to reduce global greenhouse gas emissions by 100 million tons. Trittin said that lowering the speed limit would be one way of meeting its Kyoto pollution goals. According to the article, speed limits would reduce carbon dioxide emissions, which account for 80 percent of current emissions, by about five million tons.
 

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More info:

The German Autobahn has taken on an almost legendary mystique. The reality is a little different than the legend. The myth of no speed limits is countered by the fact that Tempolimits are a fact of life on most of Germany's highways, and traffic jams are common. Signs suggesting a recommended speed limit of 130 km/h (80 mph) are posted along most autobahns, while urban sections and a few dangerous stretches sometimes have posted speed limits as "low" as 100 km/h (62 mph). The fact is that Germany's autobahn system is an extensive network of limited-access freeways that can usually provide a driver with a speedy route from city to city.



An Autobahn sign in Germany. Road signs in Europe, unlike those in the U.S., give directions by city rather than north, south, east, or west. This stretch of A5 (Autobahn 5) near Heidelberg has a sign
indicating we are headed for the Autobahnkreuz
(interchange) for Heidelberg. To navigate, you need to know the next large town or city on your route.
Within six years after the completion of the first Cologne-Bonn autobahn in 1932, Germany added 3,000 kilometers (1,860 miles) of super highway to its road network. Although Hitler has often been given credit for the autobahn, the real precursors were the Avus experimental highway in Berlin (built between 1913 and 1921) and Italy's 130-kilometer autostrada tollway between Milan and the northern Italian lakes (completed in 1923). Although Germany's depressed economy and hyperinflation of the late 1920s prevented plans for new autobahns from being carried out at the time, many miles of roadway were built during the time of the Third Reich. Hitler saw the construction of autobahns primarily as a military advantage; its benefit as a job-creation program in the 1930s was an added plus.

Today's German autobahn system stretches 11,000 km (6,800 miles) across most parts of unified Germany. Plans to increase the number and length of autobahns and other highways have often met with citizen opposition on ecological grounds. One of the latest, a new stretch along the Baltic coast in northern Germany, has been surrounded by controversy by those concerned with quality-of-life issues versus those who see economic benefits for the eastern German region.



Checking your rearview mirror is essential on the autobahn! Drivers quickly learn the importance of looking in the rearview mirror before passing (on the left only!). At speeds of 130km/h (80 mph) and up, cars can suddenly appear out of nowhere.
Austria also has an autobahn network, with some mountainous portions being built as toll (Maut) highways by public companies. Austria has a speed limit on its autobahns of 130 km/h (80 mph).

Extra: Austria and Switzerland charge drivers an annual fee for the use of their autobahns. A "vignette" sticker must be displayed on a car's windshield. Drivers entering Austria or Switzerland without a vignette must purchase one or be subject to heavy fines. If you're lucky, your rental car may already have one. If not, you will have to contribute 40 Swiss francs (about $35) to the Swiss treasury upon entering that country. Austria, unlike Switzerland, allows drivers to purchase an Autobahn-Vignette for various periods of time, from a week to a full year. You can buy an Austrian vignette at most gas stations near the autobahn or on the border.
 

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Hmmm.
 

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Thanks, jinxxy. That was very informative. I knew about certain aspects of the history, but I did not know that there was heavy opposition to expansion.

I guess the main difference between the 2 continents is that we have a friggin' on or off ramp every mile, which slows the traffic down hellatiously. Is that convenient? Sometimes I wonder why we even bother with driving on the freeway. I for one have to because it's the only way across a major river...
 

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Im back and while there are some speed limits on the autobahn most of it is settle back in the right lane and let her rip and remember “No matter how fast you go, someone's going to be faster; no matter how clear your rear-view mirror is, check again. . . There'll be someone there.”
 

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good time but the car could have been better I was in a Opel Meriva
but saw lots of nice cars Audi RS4 passed me very fast for a station wagon also lots of porsches in Austria on A1 Autobahn.
 
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