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It seems like eveybody is joining jui jitsu (sp) here in Albuquerque. Its as though everybody is an "Ultimate Fighter" now a days. Its wonderful for the bar business
 

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lol. mma is one of the fastest growing sports right now...wonder how long it'll last. it's great cuz mma gets more exposure, which leads to great things like pride coming to the US for the first time ever. wooooo
 

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If we get back to the original topic..that of 'Is martial arts on the decline?', I would have to say that for the most part it is not. True, there are McDojos and fake belt malls springing up all around, but business is business. The existence of these places does not dictate the state of martial arts as a whole.

Part of my reasoning is that the state of the arts is commeasurate with the times; people are leading busy lives, trying to do more in less time than ever before. This makes it difficult to run a school that requires people attend all day, or even many hours a week. However, knowledge and exposure of the arts has spread through commerilization of things such as pride fc and the UFC in the US. More and more people are getting exposed to different styles and very few are still in the mindset that everything out there consists of karate and kung fu. I feel that such exposure to society as a whole accounts for a big portion of the growth of the art..it is when it has sunken into obscurity that it will die. There will always be 'fakes' in anything, but the true practioners will keep it alive.

As stated before, since the world is changing, the arts are evolving also. A truly traditional art is very difficult to fit into many people's lives. As a result, depending on what they are looking to get out of it, they will pick something accordingly. For example..the chute box academy in brazil; they train in muay thai and bjj, but they aren't really 'traditional' in that sense. They train to fight (and anyone who thinks that mma is just a sport needs to check out NHB fights in brazil). This is what I mean by growth of the art. It is changing to stay relevant with our times. It's great to have forms and tradition, but if you think about it, those forms and traditions were originally nothing more than things devised to help the original practioners with some aspect during their time. I think growth and tradition must have a good balance, otherwise the art will slowly fade.
 

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Discussion Starter #45
I'm a third dan blackbelt in taekwondo under Grandmaster Sung Kim and train Brazilian Jiujitsu w/ gi, w/o gi, and MMA under Master Chris Chard and Muay Thai under Ryan "the lion" madigan. And I boxed golden glove since I was a little kid. Now going for KOTC. We do jits under N.A.G.A and I might be doing the Arnold's in ohio soon and than Pan-American tournament. What do you do Gun?
****, bro. Please be on my side when we're caught in a dark alley.

I used to take Brazilian jiu jitsu, but started in judo. I still remember getting my ass handed to me by the Pan Am contender back in 1989 or 90.
 

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Aikikai Aikido here also. trained 3 hours a day 6 days a week for three years - was supposed to fly to Hombo Dojo in Japan to do my Shodan (black belt) test but had an injury in getting ready for it... then my 1st daughter was born .... the something else & something else .... and now maybe somu would be more appropriate :headshake:

I also did an Israeli MMA called Kenpo Jitsu which like Krav Maga was developed to our reality over here, before the suicide bombers there were several years of random knife and axe attacks, also against 2 - 5 attackers trying to kidnap or drag you into a car / alley / whatever... a very viscious eye gouging nut kicking knee elbow head butt biting anything goes survival stuff

Now Im thinking of starting Tai Chi just to get me moving again :banghead: but like mentioned thru out his thread , its hard to find a good teacher teaching the real art the way its supposed to be
 

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Discussion Starter #47
Now Im thinking of starting Tai Chi just to get me moving again :banghead: but like mentioned thru out his thread , its hard to find a good teacher teaching the real art the way its supposed to be
:lol: I don't know how old you are, but I feel like I need that just to get limber. It's that or yoga or extreme stretch workouts.
 

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A warrior came into the monastery and approached the Master, sword extended. "Do you realize that I am the man who could run you through right now?" The Master replied, "Do YOU realize I am the man who could be run through right now?.
;)
 

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I've been doing both traditional and MMA for a few years now. Both can be hella fun. Although the issue with traditional is if you don't take the time to analyze a portion of the techniques and theories presented you will suck at the actual fighting aspect. Also throw in the fact that very few traditional schools offer full-contact sparring, we have a huge problem. I'm still doing both, but that's because I almost train in the traditional by myself and constantly look for people to spar with.
 

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not to knock BJJ, but its not a practical street fighting art (at least in my opinion).. Those guys get in the ring and lay on their backs getting pumelled for 20 minutes before winning some times.. This is not something i want to do int the streets especially if there are multiple attackers.

**edit.. what i really meant was.. it is not a good thinking to compare ring fighting to street fighting. Alot of kung fu techniques are lethal, and or are meant to destroy organs/bones/joints (not the same as joint locks).. this is pretty much no-go territory in the ring, but is fair game when your life is on the line (at least in Texas :irock: )
Wow this is a great thread, I have a lot of catching up to do so I apologize in advance for bringing up old issues.

There are alot of McDojos out there that is why you need to do your homework before joining one. Make sure you know what the certifications are, and that the school has those certs. In order for them to get those certs, the trainer needs to be qualified and so does his staff. World black belt schools are good. With the popularity of UFC there are a lot of uncertified instructors popping up because there is no true MMA style. There are no certs for MMA, so anyone can open a gym and call it an MMA school.

I would also have to disagree with the comment above. 90 - 99% of all street fights (god forbid your in one) go to the ground. If you know what you are doing on the ground there will be no fight as your opponet most likely won't.

I do not recall any great BJJ experts being pummeled on the ground. If you look at Royce Gracie, when you go to the ground with him he is going to finish the fight in seconds by breaking your arm or leg etc. Where they get pummeled is when they stand up. If you recall the fight between Royce and Liddell (I do not remember what UFC # that was) that is what happened. BJJ does not teach striking also it does not focus on many take downs.

If you are dedicated to MMA you should find a school that teaches the best of all martial arts forms that way you can step into the ring and stand up fight, or fight strong on the ground. If you want to take a Martial Art for the art form, do that and at the black belt stage you will be able to use it very effectively in any situation you are in.
 

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Josh not to ruin your world but having studied extensively in Choy Lay Fut and Hung Ga kung fu as well as Submission Wrestling and MMA (with an emphasis on Muay Thai and Boxing). In 98% of the time, the Submission Fighter would DESTROY the Kung Fu guy, in the street or ring. Your so-called "lethal techniques" are far and few in-between . . . . . and those "deadly techniques" are absolutely worthless if they are not practiced with any sort of intensity. This is the sort of **** pulled in most Kung Fu schools. If you want to learn how to fight, then by all means do just that: FIGHT. It doesn't matter what system of martial arts you practice. As long as you practice it realistically and practically, you should end up being a good fighter with the capabilities of defending yourself. Boxing and Muay Thai have absolutely zero inherent advantages over other martial arts such as Karate, various Kung Fu, Jujutsu, etc. However, what they do have is full-contact fighting and training that those other styles lack so much these days.

If you throw a Kyokushin Karate fighter and a Shodokan Karate fighter together, in the street . . . . which one do you think would win? Of course the Kyokushin fighter in all probability, due to a shitload of full-contact training, fighting experience, tournament experience, fighting on and off the ring, fighting with gloves and bareknuckle, etc, etc. The training is all there is to it. It doesn't matter if your style focuses on using Chi to disintegrate the opponent's organs. It won't work unless you've done those techniques under pressure, adrenaline, and with someone trying to knock you senseless.

PS - if anyone thinks I'm bashing TMA then you're sadly mistaken, go home and train. I love my kung fu styles more than anything else I've ever done; I think they are the most brutal and powerful styles out of all that I've learned. However, it's hard to train 100% with all of my techniques simply due to the nature of many of them. As such, training must be limited to a style more similar to muay thai/boxing/san shou/mma format . . . . so no one gets "seriously" hurt. As such, if you ever see me using "kung fu" it won't ever be kung fu at 100%, because that's simply retarded for the simple sake as sparring.
 

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i dropped out of kung fu for that reason (with earlier and shorter-lived times with american karate and hapkido), and due to too many injuries and a run-in with the instructor who found no problem with unsupervised sparring. he felt sparring was supposed to be a full-contact brawl. i got my nose and ribs broken and i just fucking quit. i almost sued the instructor's ass.

and this leads to the main premise: yeah, most of these schools are all about the $$$. period. they figure in high turnover of students and volume. just like any retail outlet store. that is all it mostly is. what do you expect? this is not feudal japan or china in medieval times. this is hardcore capitalism. and martial arts are FOR SALE.

sure, there are devoted sifus out there. but you must prove to be hardcore yourself as a disciple or you WILL NOT become any good. and it does take some bit of natural talent, too. not just any ******* can pay per month, get belts, and be a kung fu artist. that is just not reality.

You do realize that in Kung Fu you have to suffer quite a bit to get somewhere?!? You should come and see what we did when I trained in Hung Kuen. Training on concrete floors while allowing slams, claws, and throat ripping techniques. We practiced these at around 50%; any higher would result in serious injury. Still hurt like a bitch though.

I had my knuckles broken in sparring, fractured my left forearm from a Sau Choy (sweeping punch) gone wrong, but everything has healed and gotten stronger. No pain, no gain . . . . :nunchuk:
 

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Discussion Starter #53
I remember taking (more like trying to take) shodokan karate. At that time, I already had about 2 years of judo experience. I got bored with that class pretty quickly. The guys were just not ready to spar like I was. Then years later I took BJJ for under a year, and even then we would spar with the karate class in the same dojo that we shared. Again, no contest. I may have been new to BJJ, but the upper belts in the karate class just felt uncomfortable when fighting close combat or on the ground.

Now there was a guy in my BJJ group that had taken or was taking kung fu or wing chun and was phenomenal when it came to grappling. He and I were always being matched to practice together. Ah, the good old days.

I'm looking into getting into something again, mostly for the exercise and personal defense aspect of it.
 

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MMA is on the rise; wouldn't say traditional martial arts are dead but they certainly do not get the same time of air time.

We have Dean Lister (ADCC Champion 2003, 2005; Pride and UFC contender) and Mel Menor (Former K1 fighter, first American kickboxer to be invited by King of Thailand to compete in one of their ceremonies) at The Boxing Club in San Diego. I just did the cardio kickboxing tho for health, but it was maybe two or three times the pace you'd see at a regular gym, but I would say those are pretty good credentials. We also have fitness competitors and boxing coaches, so at least I'm not learning from somebody who got a fitness degree online.

Mainly lift weights now after being sick for a while.
 

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Discussion Starter #55
MMA is on the rise; wouldn't say traditional martial arts are dead but they certainly do not get the same time of air time.

We have Dean Lister (ADCC Champion 2003, 2005; Pride and UFC contender) and Mel Menor (Former K1 fighter, first American kickboxer to be invited by King of Thailand to compete in one of their ceremonies) at The Boxing Club in San Diego. I just did the cardio kickboxing tho for health, but it was maybe two or three times the pace you'd see at a regular gym, but I would say those are pretty good credentials. We also have fitness competitors and boxing coaches, so at least I'm not learning from somebody who got a fitness degree online.

Mainly lift weights now after being sick for a while.
Where in SD is the Boxing Club? I used to live in SD.

An invite by the King himself? That's very impressive.

I'm glad martial arts doesn't get airtime like MMA. I wouldn't want the 2 to be associated with each other.
 

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Where in SD is the Boxing Club? I used to live in SD.

An invite by the King himself? That's very impressive.

I'm glad martial arts doesn't get airtime like MMA. I wouldn't want the 2 to be associated with each other.
The Boxing Club on Convoy Street (in Balboa) is where Dean Lister teaches. Mel Menor teaches at the gym in UTC; that one opened just recently. If you watch Pride, Dean can be seen w/ Mel in his corner in the opening round of the 2005 Middleweight Grand Prix, where he lost to Ricardo Arona.
 

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I'm actually hoping for some real Muay Thai training and also Filipino Martial Arts. I have found ZERO traditional/authentic Muay Thai schools for the past 5 years in the Western Washington area . . . ok there was 1 but it was about a 3 hour drive (not gonna do that). Maybe I'll travel up to Canada.
 

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I'm actually hoping for some real Muay Thai training and also Filipino Martial Arts. I have found ZERO traditional/authentic Muay Thai schools for the past 5 years in the Western Washington area . . . ok there was 1 but it was about a 3 hour drive (not gonna do that). Maybe I'll travel up to Canada.
I would say Muay Thai is hard to find because of how violent it is, those fighters are efen crazy. I love MMA but I am not into getting my face all busted up by knees to the face.
 

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Discussion Starter #59
I'm actually hoping for some real Muay Thai training and also Filipino Martial Arts. I have found ZERO traditional/authentic Muay Thai schools for the past 5 years in the Western Washington area . . . ok there was 1 but it was about a 3 hour drive (not gonna do that). Maybe I'll travel up to Canada.
Might as well take a sabbatical and go live in Thailand for a while. I've always wanted to take MT, but the good ones are truly hard to find. I'm sure there are secret dojos that only allow relatives of friends of class members of....you get the idea.
 

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I would love to have the time to take some M.T.!! There is actually a school about 1hr-1hr 1/2 away from me. That has been pretty well talked about in MT (Baltimore area). The head instructor spent @6 months in Thailand just studing. Though he also lived with the Graci's for 3months before that!!! I personally have taken just under 3yrs of Kenpo (AKKI), messed around with some Lung Fu Do, Hapkido, very lightly touched Isshinryu. Though can't seem to break away form the Kenpo love every second of it :irock:
 
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