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Discussion Starter #1
With a V6 in place of the highly tunable Inline-6 will the new GT-R still be everyones wet dream for tunability. Like the old GT-Rs and MKIV Supras they were highly praised for the tunability of the Inline 6. With the straight motor there was enough room to make bad ass manifolds and the ability to fit big ass turbos. With the V6 in the engine bay of the new GT-R it appears that turbo upgrades will now be limited to what fits in the small space that already exists in the new GT-R. Will we see 1,000RWHP GT-Rs anymore? Will Supra still be the last highly tunable platform for the U.S.?

Even built 350Zs don't have the power levels that the Supras can attest to.

What is your take on this?
 

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The GT-R looks significantly larger than the Z (wider). This should easily provide extra room in the engine bay.

The Z engine build are all over the place and for the most part high horsepower is "mysticaly" waters that few have ventured into. There are several key factors that I see causing this:

No OEM Turbo
So just to get BOOST we are talking 7-12k investment to right. This is much different than a Supra that can handle 600hp or more on a stock block. Different beasts. It doesnt seam Nissan cared to design the car to hold that much power.

Weak block
Ok so now that we have invested 10k on a turbo kit and install, we are still limited at 400whp (safe) There are some pushing their luck and hitting 450whp or more. That is a dangerous place to play with an otherwise stock engine. There have been too many engine failures for me to even be comfortable venturing there without some insurance.

To get 500whp or more we have to at minimum do an engine build with forged internals. This is another 8K investment (+/-). We are starting to max out credit cards at this point and we still have not build up the drive train to handle this. Also, we have not addressed the fuel system which is another 1k.

As you can see, this limits the majority of owners from even venturing down this path. There are those that can afford it and dont know what they are doing, and then there are those that know what they are doing but cant afford it. It is rare to find the person that both has the finances and the know-how to hit major numbers.

While on this subject.. There ARE a few Z's in the 600+whp range and they have all noted that the car is actually faster in the mid 500whp range.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I am going to assume Nissan will be putting a aluminum block V6 in the GT-R. I'm just wondering if the motor is as strong as the old Inline-6 for high boost applications. Hopefully the engine bay will be a lot bigger for aftermarket turbos.
 

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I am going to assume Nissan will be putting a aluminum block V6 in the GT-R. I'm just wondering if the motor is as strong as the old Inline-6 for high boost applications. Hopefully the engine bay will be a lot bigger for aftermarket turbos.
I think the aluminum block is a certainty. We can hope that it comes sleeved though :) However the days of the RB26 are over.

I am still keeping my fingers crossed for a v8TT.
 

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there are a lot of ways to look at this, and toykilla hit it for the most part.

inline6 engines may offer more space next to the engine but require more length. a v6 could theoretically be placed further aft, benefiting weight and balance. although that's not the concern here, its worth noting.

as far as tunability goes of the rb26 vs the vq35, the rb26 has as of now 15+ years of oem-turbo-based tuning experience. the vq35 has 4 years of N/A experience and nothing oem-turbo based. so its hard to say that a vq35 would not be nearly as capable. the upper limit on the rb26 was something like 1300hp. will the vq35 have that potential? maybe, but no one knows. built 03-04 vq35 engines are only in the 700hp range, but again this is on an engine/control system that wasnt designed for turbo. not too bad if you ask me. it indicates that some potential is there.

one of the potential benefits to a future turbo vq35 is that it would generate a lot of torque- and have an easier time doing it than the rb26. another benefit is that the engine should produce more power easier than the rb26. if the engine is doing 400-450hp out the box as many expect, its possible that 5-600hp may come without internal work. that would be on par with the 2JZ in the Supra and the RB26. So even if the VQ may not have the upper end capabilities beyond 1000hp, how important is that? For shows it might be really important, but if its easier (read: less expensive) to get to 800hp in the VQ than in the RB26/2JZ, I think that's a trade I would make. The RB26 is NOT a cheap motor to build for high output, despite popular belief.

So while the RB26 may be a more potent overall design, I'm willing to bet that the average tuned new GT-R will be more potent than the average tuned R34 GT-R.

As far as Toyota goes, and the comparison to the Supra, again tuners had years of experience with that motor. You can't compare a Toyota built Turbo engine's performance to a Nissan N/A engine - with aftermarket turbos- performance. Toyota is where they are for a reason, that engine is exceptionally reliable and robust.

In the end I think this new GT-R will make more power easier than the R34 did, esp in the mid range (5-700hp) but will have similar power limits. New technologies will probably help compensate for the inherant weakness of the V vs inline 6.
 
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