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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
This seems to be something that people tend to disagree on. Personally, I am all for a hard break in. I am planning on getting a new G35 some time this summer, and I'll be lighting up the tires on my way off the lot. I've never had a new car engine to break in before, but I've bought a new bike and I broke it in with this same method. Here is how I plan to do it:

1st: Drive the **** out of it. Redline the engine frequently. Let off gas at high rpm letting the engine breaking effect to occur.

2nd: Change oil often. Something like once at 200 miles, then again at 1000 miles, then to the regular intervals.

Agree? Disagree?
 

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This seems to be something that people tend to disagree on. Personally, I am all for a hard break in. I am planning on getting a new G35 some time this summer, and I'll be lighting up the tires on my way off the lot. I've never had a new car engine to break in before, but I've bought a new bike and I broke it in with this same method. Here is how I plan to do it:

1st: Drive the **** out of it. Redline the engine frequently. Let off gas at high rpm letting the engine breaking effect to occur.

2nd: Change oil often. Something like once at 200 miles, then again at 1000 miles, then to the regular intervals.

Agree? Disagree?

Do what you are comfortable with. Keep in mind the clutch will need a few miles break in period. As long as you change the oil frequently and early, you'll be fine.

Bike engines, I am certain, are already broken in before they are put on the frame. Car engines generally follow this pattern.

If it were me again, I would take the first 500 miles fairly easy, after that it's fair game. My Z was doing laps around the track at 600 miles.

Just give yourself time to break in as well. Don't forget that you will be getting acquainted with the car as well.
 

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Do what you are comfortable with. Keep in mind the clutch will need a few miles break in period. As long as you change the oil frequently and early, you'll be fine.

Bike engines, I am certain, are already broken in before they are put on the frame. Car engines generally follow this pattern.

If it were me again, I would take the first 500 miles fairly easy, after that it's fair game. My Z was doing laps around the track at 600 miles.

Just give yourself time to break in as well. Don't forget that you will be getting acquainted with the car as well.
Considering that I just broke my new motor in not to long ago, here is the low down I was informed of at the shop.

Take the car on the highway, back roads or what ever. Don't beat the crap out of it, but try to keep the car in a gear or so ahead of normal driving. For example be in 5th at 40mph rather than 4th. You want to put the engine under load, so go from 40 to 70 in 5 -6th gear giving the engine constant acceleration without revving it out to redline. This will help seat your rings. you dont' want to beat the crap out of the car, nor do you want to baby it.
 

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Curious. How do they break in the engine before it is put in a car?

Assy. Line. and/or engine dyno for race applications.


Considering that I just broke my new motor in not to long ago, here is the low down I was informed of at the shop.

Take the car on the highway, back roads or what ever. Don't beat the crap out of it, but try to keep the car in a gear or so ahead of normal driving. For example be in 5th at 40mph rather than 4th. You want to put the engine under load, so go from 40 to 70 in 5 -6th gear giving the engine constant acceleration without revving it out to redline. This will help seat your rings. you dont' want to beat the crap out of the car, nor do you want to baby it.

There you go^^ a recent first hand account from someone that didn't want to destroy a newly built motor. Load is important on a new engine as Zivman stated.
 

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I would put my money that the engines are broken in before they are ever put in the Z/G.
You'd lose your money - read the owner's manual. Modern production engines are built to tolerences, and to keep costs down these tolerences are not perfect fits. Bottom line, they require time to wear in and thus fit correctly - high spots have to be worn down, rings have to wear in to the crosshatch pattern on the cyliner walls, cam followers need to fully mate to cam lobes, transmission gears and syncros must wear in together, timing chains need to loosen up, etc. etc. This is best done in a somewhat gentle manner rather than by blasting the engine at full song right off the lot - less damage to bearings, rings, et al. This is why the owner's manuals for virtually all new cars strongly recommend a specific break-in procedure rather than say nothing and leave it up to the owner. What difference does it make? By letting the sliding surfaces mate together correctly they don't gall, friction is reduced, cylinder sealing is better - lots of reasons to do the specified break-in.

Why not do the break-in? Only one reason - because some owners are too impatient to wait a week or two, sacrificing the future of the vehicle to satisfy their short-term lack of self control. Those who say they drove it like they stole it right off the lot always say their car turned out fine....for the first few thousand miles. Do or don't do the recommended break-in, it's your car and it's your money. :wavey:
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
http://www.mototuneusa.com/break_in_secrets.htm

This page has been around awhile. I have a friend at work who is a fellow mechanical engineer. He used to rebuild engines and used the exact same method. He did claim, however, that it is possible to break-in too hard. If you try to tear your engine apart, you might be successful at it... I know I could do it ;)
 

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I've always just driven it like I normally do from day one. My old 91 Nissan truck with 6cyl has 265,000 mile on it now with no problems. The only thing I have ever done differently was my Departments Harley Police RoadKing. Dealer said no speed over 50mph for first 50 miles and vary speeds up to 50mph up and down for a while.
Back in the day (1970's) I had an old Sarge who used to take the new Dodge Patrol cars with the 383 or 440 Magnum and run it as hard and as fast as he could for about 30 miles or so. His cars never had any problems and ran like a "bat out of ****". But then again he usually wrecked one about once a year so we never really got to see how long they would last.....;-)
 

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I followed the nissan break in period to the T, I am a scurdycat tho :lol:

Scurdycat? I thought you were a jinxxycat :)


But yeah, I'd follow the manual. It's there for a reason.

I'll even expand on this a bit: You must also properly break in your clutch and brakes as well. You can accomplish all three at one time by simply driving the car normally, like you would with a non-performance car. Pretend it's a sedan or something, and just drive it normally. Keep her under 4000rpm, avoid quick starts and stops, and be easy on the clutch (NO drops).
 

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I would put my money that the engines are broken in before they are ever put in the Z/G.
Unfortunately, mass production vehicles receive practically zero break-in from the factory.

After the engine is assembled, it is bolted to a test stand and started using CNG or propane. The engine is typically only ran for a few seconds to verify startup and idle. After being installed in the vehicle the engine is started again and driven into an alignment station/dyno. The wheels are aligned and a quick dyno pull is performed to verify compression, emissions and performance. From there the car will be driven into a lot to await shipping.

The new car will then be loaded into a shipping container by a person who is more concerned with time than properly breaking in the engine. The reverse happens when the car arrives. Then it’s onto the truck for the trip to the dealership. Once there it is given a few more “test drives” by disgruntled mechanics and salesmen.

And that’s the story behind factory break-ins.

Good Luck
Ronin Z
 

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Yikes ronin.. scary to think about that stuff. I'm hoping my car was driven by Nissan's little old ladies when it was transported.. :(
 

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Unfortunately, mass production vehicles receive practically zero break-in from the factory.

After the engine is assembled, it is bolted to a test stand and started using CNG or propane. The engine is typically only ran for a few seconds to verify startup and idle. After being installed in the vehicle the engine is started again and driven into an alignment station/dyno. The wheels are aligned and a quick dyno pull is performed to verify compression, emissions and performance. From there the car will be driven into a lot to await shipping.

The new car will then be loaded into a shipping container by a person who is more concerned with time than properly breaking in the engine. The reverse happens when the car arrives. Then it’s onto the truck for the trip to the dealership. Once there it is given a few more “test drives” by disgruntled mechanics and salesmen.

And that’s the story behind factory break-ins.

Good Luck
Ronin Z

Good post! :welcome:
 

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I'll even expand on this a bit: You must also properly break in your clutch and brakes as well. You can accomplish all three at one time by simply driving the car normally, like you would with a non-performance car. Pretend it's a sedan or something, and just drive it normally. Keep her under 4000rpm, avoid quick starts and stops, and be easy on the clutch (NO drops).
[/quote]

What is wrong with having a sedan??!!
I have a 200 civic ex sedan and I am crazy on occasion. You cant say that i dont drive it as hard as other people do in their sports cars, cuz I once went through an entire gas tank in less than a week just driving home from school.
That may not seem too bad, but I live less than 5 miles away and I usually get about 35 mpg city.

Not to sound like a jerk, but thought you should know, I have done some crazy stuff that makes my head spin when reflecting back on it. (If you were wondering, I have not crashed once.-driven it into a ditch but that is another story)

NOTE: I am 17- that is my excuse for the riskyness and I am sticking to it. :irock:
 

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This seems to be something that people tend to disagree on. Personally, I am all for a hard break in. I am planning on getting a new G35 some time this summer, and I'll be lighting up the tires on my way off the lot. I've never had a new car engine to break in before, but I've bought a new bike and I broke it in with this same method. Here is how I plan to do it:

1st: Drive the **** out of it. Redline the engine frequently. Let off gas at high rpm letting the engine breaking effect to occur.

2nd: Change oil often. Something like once at 200 miles, then again at 1000 miles, then to the regular intervals.

Agree? Disagree?
I think that is break-in procedure for racing engines. This enable a wear pattern to allow more power production, at the expense of longevity. Most racing engines aren't meant to last 100,000miles+.
 

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First 1000 miles treat her like a lady. Thereafter slowly learn her to be treated like a tramp. (fill in your own fantasy on this one)
;-)
 
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