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I understand how the electrical system in a car works. The purpose of the Hyper-Voltage kit is to provide a constant voltage to the car's electrical system (after the battery). Put a voltmeter on a car battery while the car is running. The voltage isn't constant. The car stereo world has been using voltage stabilizers to provide a constant 14.4V to amplifiers for years. I think the Hyper-Voltage system is basically the same device, but it's being used for the whole car's electrical system. As I said before, I haven't tested one, so whether or not this provides any benefit is to me unknown.
No little box is going to stabilze the voltage to any significant amount particular SOOO far from the load. The best way to try to stabilze the system is as close to the load as possible. Near the fuse box is as far from any load as you can get.
 

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No little box is going to stabilze the voltage to any significant amount particular SOOO far from the load. The best way to try to stabilze the system is as close to the load as possible. Near the fuse box is as far from any load as you can get.
Whatever. Like I said, I haven't tested it.
 

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No little box is going to stabilze the voltage to any significant amount particular SOOO far from the load. The best way to try to stabilze the system is as close to the load as possible. Near the fuse box is as far from any load as you can get.

I do not know what the Hyper-Voltage thing is, but I am very confident that it IS NOT a voltage regulator. Every voltage regulator that I am familiar with is a three prong device (not two prongs); one prong for supply voltage, one prong for return (ground) and one prong for the regulated voltage. It IS NOT a capacitor, because the battery delivers DC current and a capacitor appears as an open circiut to DC, meaning no current flows, therefore the device would have absolutely no effect. It IS NOT a resistor, because a resistor appears as a load; current will flow and voltage will be dropped across the resistive load and discharge the battery, offering no other benefit. It COULD NOT be inductor, because an inductive load will be seen as a short to DC current. I do not know what it could be , but would like to see an explanation.

With respect to the audio components, any builder of quality audio parts has voltage regulation built into their products. They will not rely upon the regulation of outboard power supplies.
 

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As the latest new technologies continue to find their way into our vehicles, electrical system performance becomes increasingly more critical to automotive performance. Newer cars all use computers to control virtually every aspect of the engine, transmission, and electrical accessory performance. Engines and transmissions are typically grounded to the alternator and battery in one location, and usually there is a great distance between this grounding point and the various electrical components, and these components are seldom mounted directly to the engine block or transmission case. This creates variations in the voltage at these points. When a sensor sends information to the computer, the computer in return sends out a signal to make the necessary adjustments to other components. However, if there is a slight variation in the voltage or loss of current flow, the computer will not compensate correctly and this can cause a loss of efficiency. Additionally, common grounds sharing current flow can limit the performance of various components such as electronically controlled throttle bodies. ActiveTuning offers a multi-cable system specifically engineered for each vehicle application offered. Heavy 4 gauge 99.99% pure copper audio grade cables with 1666 strands each provide a direct path to ground for critical components allowing the entire electrical system to operate at maximum efficiency.
Benefits
Our grounding kits potentially offer one or more of the following benefits to your vehicle:
· Increased Horse Power & Torque
· Awesome Looks
· Faster Shifts on Automatics
· Improved Mileage
· Reduced Emissions
· Stronger & Faster Starts
· Smoother Idle
· More Responsive Acceleration
· Reduced Audio Noise
· Improved Electrical Accessory Performance (brighter lights, windows/sunroofs operate faster, better radio reception, etc.)
http://www.activetuning.com/customgroundingkits/learnmore/

This always creates a lot of debate - the generally accepted theory is that installation of an earthing kit can restore lost power/torque, where the loss is due to inefficient earthing, due to age, wear & tear etc. You might not realise your car is running short on power because of an earthing issue, but when a grounding kit fixes this you'll notice.

first part is what they are ment to do and second part is the reality of the cause
 

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I do not know what the Hyper-Voltage thing is, but I am very confident that it IS NOT a voltage regulator. Every voltage regulator that I am familiar with is a three prong device (not two prongs); one prong for supply voltage, one prong for return (ground) and one prong for the regulated voltage. It IS NOT a capacitor, because the battery delivers DC current and a capacitor appears as an open circiut to DC, meaning no current flows, therefore the device would have absolutely no effect. It IS NOT a resistor, because a resistor appears as a load; current will flow and voltage will be dropped across the resistive load and discharge the battery, offering no other benefit. It COULD NOT be inductor, because an inductive load will be seen as a short to DC current. I do not know what it could be , but would like to see an explanation.

With respect to the audio components, any builder of quality audio parts has voltage regulation built into their products. They will not rely upon the regulation of outboard power supplies.
I don't have a professional explanation nor solid evidence w/ dynographs and stuff, but I did experience a sun hyper-voltage unit on my other car. I did notice a louder/cleaner stereo, brighter headlights, easier ignition starts, increased engine response and definitely felt an increase in torque. You are right on w/ todays audio companies who develop amplifiers, which in today's products do include those built-in capacitors, but when I had the hyper-voltage, it just made my sound system even more efficient.
From what I understand it helps keeps your electrical system flowing efficiently w/o drain on the battery and alternator, therefore, would make sense from other posts that it does free up power.

Many race shops down here sell them, and a few of those shops are quite reputable as far as the products they sell. A place called Vakamon Motorsports here, linked to Tarzan in Japan, sells them, and the store employees even experienced them and recommend them. They definitely wouldn't sell something that does not offer what it claims it does.
 

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With respect to the audio components, any builder of quality audio parts has voltage regulation built into their products. They will not rely upon the regulation of outboard power supplies.
Amplifiers are regulated after their internal power supply, however this has nothing to do with their input voltage. The input voltage is whatever your vehicle's electrical system provides. Look at the specs for any amplifier. The power output is rated at 12V input and at 14.4V input. The output at 14.4V is always higher. IASCA SQ competition systems frequently use a voltage stabilizer to send 14.4V to the amps.
 

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First things first, I have no financial stake in any automotive after-market interests.
I am an electrical engineer with the nation’s largest defense contractor. My job involves designing military radar systems. I say this so you understand that I have knowledge of this subject.

Secondly, the latest post by ChargedZ is simply marketing hyperbole by a manufacturer of grounding kits. It is akin to Kellogg’s stating the Lucky Charms is part of a good breakfast, when in fact the breakfast would be better without the Lucky Charms.

Thirdly, I am just trying to put forth accurate information. If it blows your skirt up to add a grounding kit, then have at it, bearing in mind:

If you measure the resistance between the cylinder head and the negative terminal of the battery and you get a very low reading, typically less than 1 ohm, then the stock return line (ground line) is functioning as intended. Adding more “grounding” will not provide any performance increase, electrical or otherwise.

The current in the spark plug circuit is direct current (DC) as opposed to alternating current (AC). The only AC current you will find in a car is in the audio system (the audio system power supply is DC) .

With respect to the after-market grounding kits, you DO NOT need oxygen-free, 10 gauge wires. The system is passing a DC signal at low current. It is not passing AC with varying frequencies. DC does not have a phase, so there is no phase stability to be concerned with. If you feel the need to improve the ground wire go to your local hardware store and buy a length of braided ground strap. This can be purchased for about 50 cents per foot.

If you still feel the need to do 10 gauge, oxygen-free copper ground wires with gold-plated lugs (be sure that the gold is plated directly copper and without an intermediate plating of nickel between the copper and gold, because nickel is a very poor conductor), then you will also need to replace all the electrical supply lines with the same. Improving the quality of the return line will offer no improvement without improving the supply. I would also investigate the quality of the wiring, circuit traces and component parts contained within the ECUs, computers, sensors and all other electrical devices in the car.

If you still feel the need have at it… I should have gone into the snake oil business.
 

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First things first, I have no financial stake in any automotive after-market interests.
I am an electrical engineer with the nation’s largest defense contractor. My job involves designing military radar systems. I say this so you understand that I have knowledge of this subject.

Secondly, the latest post by ChargedZ is simply marketing hyperbole by a manufacturer of grounding kits. It is akin to Kellogg’s stating the Lucky Charms is part of a good breakfast, when in fact the breakfast would be better without the Lucky Charms.

Thirdly, I am just trying to put forth accurate information. If it blows your skirt up to add a grounding kit, then have at it, bearing in mind:

If you measure the resistance between the cylinder head and the negative terminal of the battery and you get a very low reading, typically less than 1 ohm, then the stock return line (ground line) is functioning as intended. Adding more “grounding” will not provide any performance increase, electrical or otherwise.

The current in the spark plug circuit is direct current (DC) as opposed to alternating current (AC). The only AC current you will find in a car is in the audio system (the audio system power supply is DC) .

With respect to the after-market grounding kits, you DO NOT need oxygen-free, 10 gauge wires. The system is passing a DC signal at low current. It is not passing AC with varying frequencies. DC does not have a phase, so there is no phase stability to be concerned with. If you feel the need to improve the ground wire go to your local hardware store and buy a length of braided ground strap. This can be purchased for about 50 cents per foot.

If you still feel the need to do 10 gauge, oxygen-free copper ground wires with gold-plated lugs (be sure that the gold is plated directly copper and without an intermediate plating of nickel between the copper and gold, because nickel is a very poor conductor), then you will also need to replace all the electrical supply lines with the same. Improving the quality of the return line will offer no improvement without improving the supply. I would also investigate the quality of the wiring, circuit traces and component parts contained within the ECUs, computers, sensors and all other electrical devices in the car.

If you still feel the need have at it… I should have gone into the snake oil business.
Everything the man just said is absolutely true. And as history shows, I am not always one to cast my vote in with dm4.

-RZ
 

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I feel the need to use 0 gauge ground wires now.

In reality it is the placebo effect. You just spend 50$-200$ on wires and you expect to see some type of improvement. I feel this community wants to use ground wires since the Z has no spark plug wires to make the engine bay pretty with.
 

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I feel the need to use 0 gauge ground wires now.

In reality it is the placebo effect. You just spend 50$-200$ on wires and you expect to see some type of improvement. I feel this community wants to use ground wires since the Z has no spark plug wires to make the engine bay pretty with.
Nothing wrong with making things pretty.
 

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This always creates a lot of debate - the generally accepted theory is that installation of an earthing kit can restore lost power/torque, where the loss is due to inefficient earthing, due to age, wear & tear etc. You might not realise your car is running short on power because of an earthing issue, but when a grounding kit fixes this you'll notice.

first part is what they are ment to do and second part is the reality of the cause
that is the only part of my previous post important, i listed the first part because of the fact that it is exactly the marketing of a grounding kit manufacturer, now at the bottom is the truth in why gains are found
 

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So.. i dug this thread up.. Did some searching but couldn’t find anything.

Q:
Do the new 07s have factory grounding kits?

For me the look is intriguing, the technical side will forever turn my mind to mush.
 

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Wrong,wrong wrong!!!

Lower resistance will NOT provide more voltage to anything. The battery and alternator are the power supplies and supply a fixed voltage. Reducing resistance will increase current. In addition, electronic parts have specific voltage operating ranges. Operating parts outside of the ranges will cause damage (i.e. If 12 volts is good, 15 volts IS NOT better).

Furthermore, the amount of resistance in any piece of wire is insignificant when compared to the amount of resistance in the active circuit. The amount of resistance measured in any length of wire typically found in an automobile is going to be less than 1 ohm and typically less then 1/10 ohm. This resistance value can not be appreciably reduced and therefore any minute reduction in resistance will have no effect on the performance of the circuit.
I know that its an old post, but I want to address this. Sorry bro, but you will see a voltage drop across the resistor. Its a very small one (thus what I've been saying all along). Current has to be the same throughout the circuit (how many electrons are flowing through). In order for the circuit to follow the laws of physics, there has to be a drop in voltage.

The system I8ACobra has been may work well I have no idea. If it can stabilize the power flow it may help, I know audio guys shell over big money for APC power supplies.

Pat
 

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I am reposting this because feel the need to inform:

I hate to seen cynical, but grounding kits have to be one of the best scams going. What in the world are we supposed to be grounding? These kits are not grounding your car, there is no connection to ground. Connecting to ground requires a connection to the earth. What many people like to call a ground line is really a return line. All electrical circuits need a supply line and a return line for current to flow. What electrical circuit are you completeing by installing these "grounding kits"?

Here is a vendor's explanation of the need for a grounding kit that was posted at 350Z Motoring.com. I deleted the vendor's name in the interest of good manners. Following his expalnation is my reply. I look forward to furher discussion on this topic.
Quote:
Originally Posted by xxxxxxx
350Z Engine Grounding/Earthing Kit:

Automotive electrical and computer systems are designed to tolerate up to 100% noise on its input lines. Meaning, if the ECU is expecting a 12-volt input signal, the signal may vary in the range of 0 to 12 volts. Fluctuations in signal are due to noise in the system. Noise is generated by spark plugs firing, discharges through the tires to the road, alternator turning on/off, etc. In other words, there is a lot of inherent noise an automotive electrical system.

One of the best-proven ways to compensate for noise is with proper grounding.

When measuring a DC (direct current) signal, almost any kind of wire will due. However, when measuring a high frequency input (i.e. the mass air flow sensor or the air/fuel mixture sensor) it is necessary to run a ground wire in parallel with your signal. The engine grounding/earthing kit provides grounding along side each signal wire.

The 350Z Engine Grounding/Earthing Kit allows for cleaner data transfer to the ECU. The result is more accurate measurements by the ECU and therefore more accurate performance, smoother idle and acceleration.
My Reply:

Sorry, but I have to call you on this.

1) No electrical system will operate on 0 volts. There must be an electrical potential for current to flow and every electrical device has a minimum voltage it wants to see. Prove this to yourself. Go to Analog Devices web site (www.analog.com), choose any device, look at the data sheet and you will find min. and max. voltage operating ranges.

2) Noise will cause distortion in a signal. Noise is defined as any unwanted signal. Grounding WILL NOT remove noise from a signal, Shielding will prevent noise from interfering with a signal and filtering will remove noise from a signal. Auto manufacturers go to great lengths to shield their electrical systems from receiving and generating unwanted signals. The FCC mandates this. If ignition wiring voltage (tens of thousands of volts) gets to your ECU then your ECU will immediately fail due to over voltage. The max power supply voltage most miniature circuits want to see is 15 volts and signal voltage is lower.

3) There is no current flowing through the tires!!! The tires are rubber and act as an insulator. This is why static charge builds up on a car and you will occasionally get a shock when you touch the car. If the tires were conductive this current would go to ground. By the way, if the static charge is strong enough for you to feel, then it is at about 20,000 volts.

4) Grounding WILL NOT remove noise from a system. Improper grounding can induce noise by setting up a ground loop.

5) Measuring DC vs. alternating current. I am a little confused by this statement. Measuring AC or DC voltage or current only requires a multi-meter. I have one and have done all of these measurements. If this statement actually deals with running AC vs. DC circuits, both circuits require a 'ground wire'. It is actually a return wire (A ground wire is the third wire you would typically see in your home wiring. This wire actually goes to ground and is a safety precaution). A circuit has to be complete for current to flow.

6) The signal sent by the MAF and A/F meter is a DC signal of varying voltage. The voltage may vary rapidly, but this in no way, shape or manner makes the signal anything other than DC. The frequency of the signal is zero.

7) I cannot imagine how a grounding kit will allow cleaner data to be made available to the ECU. Grounding WILL NOT remove noise from a signal.

8) If there is a difference of voltage potential between various parts off the car it can be measured with a voltmeter. I did this with the car running.

I made measurements based on the instructions for placement of the grounding wires. There was NO difference in the voltage potential between the different sides of the plenum. No difference between either side of the plenum and the front of the engine. No difference between either side of the plenum, front of the engine, and the vehicle chassis. Where I DID measure a voltage potential was between the negative terminal of the battery and all those other pieces. The bad news was that all those other pieces were at a lower potential than the negative terminal of the battery by 0.015 volts. The reason that the negative battery terminal has a voltage potential greater than zero is because the negative terminal of the alternator now serves as the low voltage reference. If you run a wire from the battery to those other parts, current will flow from the negative terminal of the battery to those parts. I don't really think that is such a good idea.
So, what is a grounding kit doing ...maybe just demonstarting that the palcebo effect is real.
 

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"If you measure the resistance between the cylinder head and the negative terminal of the battery and you get a very low reading, typically less than 1 ohm, then the stock return line (ground line) is functioning as intended. Adding more “grounding” will not provide any performance increase, electrical or otherwise."


True only for low current DC. Remove the ground cable from the battery and Replace it with 18ga wire and check your ground as you describe. Yep, less than 1 ohm resistance only now you have made a fuse.

Resistance is ok for DC. For digital signals you need to use inductance. If you Fluke VOM set it on AC volt scale and put one and on the ground connection of any noisy device and the other lead on the final ground point i.e.. battery terminal. You will see voltage and this is one ground point to another. A VOM is OK for real noisy devices like alternators or ignition. For computers and digital sensors you need a scope.

If you ever looked at the cables inside your PC you may have noticed twisted pairs: one signal and the other ground. Signal cables, often ribbon, have every other wire ground- signal, ground, signal, ground etc.
 

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Hi,

Can someone help me identify where the locations of my grounding wires are on my 2005 350Z?

I have been having issues with my MAF sensor which I turn has been causing episodes of flat spots (power lacking) for a few seconds sometimes a minute long.
I took it to a Nissan dealership and they checked what error codes were popping up. They told me it was the MAF sensor, so they cleaned it and I have not had an engine light since. I then experienced the flat spot again and the dealership told me it must be an earth connection that is not connected properly that may be effecting the MAF sensor, making it pass an inaccurate reading to the ECU.

Anyways has anyone had this issue?
Can someone help me find the locations so I can go tighten them up?

Thanks
 

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You've unearthed (pun intended) a long-dead thread. But to answer your question, there is no grounding kit installed from the factory on your z33. As for your "flat spots" you might want to get a baseline dyno done to examine the issue. Looking at the power curve on a chart will not only quantity the issue, but also provide baseline data.
 
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