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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey guys, im reading up about the many different TT's out on the maket, and for example the APS has twin "ball bearing" turbos...This might seem like an amatuer question, but can someone explain to me what that means, and hows it different from lets say the turbo's that come in the Greddy TT? Thanks

Joe
 

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Hey guys, im reading up about the many different TT's out on the maket, and for example the APS has twin "ball bearing" turbos...This might seem like an amatuer question, but can someone explain to me what that means, and hows it different from lets say the turbo's that come in the Greddy TT? Thanks

Joe

APS has a good write up on the ball bearing turbos:

Check it out here
 

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All turbos have a shaft that connects the impeller to the compressor. Most conventional turbos use a journal style bearing where the shaft just rests on supporting metal(a housing) and only oil is inbetween them. These turbos rely on oil to provide lubrication which allows the shaft to rotate freely. Since the oil is the main component, the rotational speed of the shaft depends on the quality of the oil, how thick it is, viscosity, etc. If you don't change your oil when using these turbos, your performance will degrade over time.

Ball bearing tubos use a sealed bearing with metal balls to provide the support of the shaft on the metal (housing). Since ball bearings have a better rotational speed than oil for the RPM range that a turbo would normally operate in. They allow for a quicker spool up of boost and also have better performance. Their performance will not decrease over time like the oil does.

Ball bearing turbos are becoming more common but they also come with a higher cost. In the end they are worth it IMHO. Hope this helps.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
All turbos have a shaft that connects the impeller to the compressor. Most conventional turbos use a journal style bearing where the shaft just rests on supporting metal(a housing) and only oil is inbetween them. These turbos rely on oil to provide lubrication which allows the shaft to rotate freely. Since the oil is the main component, the rotational speed of the shaft depends on the quality of the oil, how thick it is, viscosity, etc. If you don't change your oil when using these turbos, your performance will degrade over time.

Ball bearing tubos use a sealed bearing with metal balls to provide the support of the shaft on the metal (housing). Since ball bearings have a better rotational speed than oil for the RPM range that a turbo would normally operate in. They allow for a quicker spool up of boost and also have better performance. Their performance will not decrease over time like the oil does.

Ball bearing turbos are becoming more common but they also come with a higher cost. In the end they are worth it IMHO. Hope this helps.
Thanks guys, yes it did help clear thing up alot...i appreciate it
 
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