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Numbers 3 and 4, I plead guilty to. I seem to get best fuel economy (28mpg) at 75mph, and less at 60 or 80 (around 24mpg). I think maybe number 3 doesn't apply to us, since our cars are so aerodynamic. And number 4, I always thought drafting saves fuel? hehe




1. Racing away from green lights



When the light turns green, you don't have to take off as quickly as possible. That pedal under your right foot is called the "gas pedal" for a good reason. The more you press down on it, the more gas you're pumping into the engine.



Press lightly on the gas pedal, and you'll still accelerate, and you'll still get where you're going. You might be surprised at how little pressure it takes to get your car up to speed in a reasonable time.



2. Racing up to red lights



When you're driving down the street, and you see a light red light or stop sign up ahead, you should lay off the gas sooner rather than later.



There's no point in keeping your foot on the gas until just before you reach the intersection. Let off the pedal sooner and give your engine a rest as you coast to the stop while braking gently. As an added benefit, your brake pads will last longer, too.



By themselves, these first two tips can improve your fuel economy around town by as much as 35 percent, according to tests conducted by automotive information Web site Edmunds.com.



3. Confusing the highway with a speedway



Even if it doesn't involve hard acceleration, speeding wastes gas. The faster you go, the more air your vehicle has to push out of the way. It's like moving your hand through water. The faster you try to move your hand, the harder the water pushes back.



In tests by Consumer Reports, driving at 75 miles per hour instead of 65 miles per hour reduced fuel economy by between 3 and 5 miles per gallon, depending on the vehicle.



4. Bumper-buzzing



Tailgating is a bad move for many reasons. First of all, it's unsafe. You reduce your ability to react if the car in front of you slows or stops. It also means you have to pay ultra-close attention to that car which reduces your ability to scan for other hazards ahead of you and to the sides.



And tailgating wastes gas. Every time the driver ahead taps his brakes, you have to slow down even more than he did. (That's because you can't react immediately so you have to slow even more because you're slowing down later.) Then you accelerate again to get back up to speed and resume your bumper-buzzing routine.



Hang back and you'll be safer - plus you'll be able to drive more smoothly and use less fuel. A good rule of thumb is to allow two seconds of space between your car and the one ahead. You can figure that out by counting off two seconds after the car in front of you passes an obvious landmark like an overpass.



5. Driving standing still



You've probably heard that it takes more gas to restart a car than to let it run. Maybe that used to be true, but it isn't anymore. With modern fuel-injection engines, it takes very little extra gas to restart a car once it's warmed up.



Idling, meanwhile, burns about a half-mile worth of gas every minute, according to the California Energy Commission. That's why hybrid cars shut down their gasoline engines whenever they stop, even for a moment.



Now you don't want to shut your engine down for every little stop in your regular, non-hybrid car - it's not designed for that - but if you're waiting for someone to run in and out of a convenience store, turn off the engine.



And don't go through the drive-through at fast food restaurants. You're already paying enough for the oil in those chicken nuggets.



Bonus tip: Don't idle your engine to let it warm up before driving. It does your engine no good and it wastes gas. Instead, start driving right away, but drive gently until the engine is warm.



6. Short hops



For really short trips, take advantage of the opportunity to get some exercise. Try walking to the store instead of driving. You can save gas and burn a few calories instead.



If you can't hoof it, save up your errands. A lot of short hops that let the engine cool down at home between trips can use twice as much gas as starting the car once and making a big sweep to all your stops, according to the U.S. Department of Energy.



Go to your farthest destination first so your engine has a chance to reach its optimal operating temperature. Then make your other stops on the way back. With the engine warmed up, the car will restart easily and run efficiently all the way home.
 

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I am guilty of 1 and 3. But I hate the people Who don't hurry up at the light. There are people behind you who would also like to get through the light. so get your but in gear and get through it.
 

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People that do the first 3 are the number one cause of road rage. When the light turns green, I can't stand when the guy in front of me takes a mile to get up to the speed limit. I also can't stand it when there's a red light 1/2 mile up the road and the guy in front of me starts coasting down. They then slow to a creep 10 car lengths back from the light and creep all the way up, like they're afraid to come to a complete stop. When you get someone doing both of these things, it really gets me fuming because we never actually get up to the speed limit. We get almost there, then start slowing for the next light. You know what people, some of us have somewhere we need to be. We don't have the luxury of taking all day to complete one task. This brings us to number 3. You wanna go the speed limit on the highway? That's cool. Just stay the f*ck out of the left lane. The left lane is for passing. If you're going the speed limit, you're not passing anyone.
 

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QUOTE (Jetpilot718 @ Jun 9 2008, 06:52 AM) index.php?act=findpost&pid=534361
And tailgating wastes gas.
*cough*slipstreaming*cough* ;-)

I have mates who've tried to drive the 130+ miles home from a race track on almost no fuel (the town it was located in didn't have high octane back then and the jerry cans were empty), who've just sat inches from the rear bar of another car to take reap the fuel-economy advantages of drafting. They had a few nudges when they got too close, but rubbin'z economizin'.

Like #3 says about "the more air your vehicle has to push out of the way" (which isn't technically accurate as the amount of air remains the same, just the rate at which you want to travel through it changes..its not like the atmosphere drops pressure if you slow down or we'd all suffocate in a vacuum if everyone just stopped moving) there's two ways you can get around wind resistance. One is to slow down, which is their idea. The other is to get someone else to break its resistance for you :p
 

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good read. when my first started teaching me how to drive some 2 odd years ago. he always tought me to cruize when you see a yellow or red light or stop sign.

Also if you want to save others gas. put your turn signal on before you brake to make a turn so the car behind you. say your on a 4 lane road will have time to get over into the other lane and not have to adjust there speed.
 

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I suppose that I'm guilty of #3 I do find myself speeding in the Z. On the others, I guess I've learned one way or another that you need to drive conservatively on public roads and leave the speed for the track. And I have to say that I am the kind of driver that leaves a *huge* cushion between myself and the car ahead of me b/c you never know what the ******* is going to pull. And as soon as I have the nice comfortable cushion between me and the vehicle in front of me, some jag off comes and pulls in front of me into said cushion....idiots.

QUOTE (i8acobra @ Jun 8 2008, 09:32 PM) index.php?act=findpost&pid=534476
You wanna go the speed limit on the highway? That's cool. Just stay the f*ck out of the left lane.
And if I come up on the said offender, I blast this song and wait patiently for them to get the **** out of MY WAY.... :lol: I don't tailgate them but I've been known to give the "friendly" flash of the highbeams (or rapidly flash them, either way sometimes they get the picture sometimes they don't)


<object width="425" height="344"><param name="movie" value="http://www.youtube.com/v/shgw8m0aR4s&hl=en"></param><embed src="http://www.youtube.com/v/shgw8m0aR4s&hl=en" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" width="425" height="344"></embed></object>
 

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i do coast really slow up to yellow lights and such but its not really to save gas i will drop to like 20 or 25 and slow all the way down to around 15 to avoid stopping just to save time. If you hurry up to it your gonna have to stop and then start so it takes longer if you can level your speed before you get there to be going as fast as possible when it turns green you get to start out going like 20 not at a dead stop, you also don't have to start your car moving which takes alot of gas and you don't have to put any wear on your breaks because you can just coast to that slow. AND your saving time
 

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Discussion Starter #9
QUOTE (jinxxycat @ Jun 8 2008, 10:43 PM) index.php?act=findpost&pid=534496
I don't tailgate them but I've been known to give the "friendly" flash of the highbeams (or rapidly flash them, either way sometimes they get the picture sometimes they don't)

Americans have no idea what high beams mean. Or, they think it means "F*ck your mother" and they brake-check you. The only time I tailgate is when some slug is hogging the left lane and theres like 4 miles of open road ahead of them. They usually get the idea. Or, I'll just start honking like you would if someone fell asleep at the light lol



Something they forgot to mention:

Coasting to a stop in neutral is WRONG. You are using fuel to keep your car at idle speed. Coasting to a stop in gear is using zero fuel, as the injectors shut off when the throttle is closed while in gear. So your best bet is leaving it in 4th or so until you come to around 5mph, then go to neutral.
 

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QUOTE (Jetpilot718 @ Jun 8 2008, 03:52 PM) index.php?act=findpost&pid=534361
Numbers 3 and 4, I plead guilty to. I seem to get best fuel economy (28mpg) at 75mph, and less at 60 or 80 (around 24mpg). I think maybe number 3 doesn't apply to us, since our cars are so aerodynamic. And number 4, I always thought drafting saves fuel? hehe




1. Racing away from green lights



When the light turns green, you don't have to take off as quickly as possible. That pedal under your right foot is called the "gas pedal" for a good reason. The more you press down on it, the more gas you're pumping into the engine.



Press lightly on the gas pedal, and you'll still accelerate, and you'll still get where you're going. You might be surprised at how little pressure it takes to get your car up to speed in a reasonable time

2. Racing up to red lights



When you're driving down the street, and you see a light red light or stop sign up ahead, you should lay off the gas sooner rather than later.



There's no point in keeping your foot on the gas until just before you reach the intersection. Let off the pedal sooner and give your engine a rest as you coast to the stop while braking gently. As an added benefit, your brake pads will last longer, too.



By themselves, these first two tips can improve your fuel economy around town by as much as 35 percent, according to tests conducted by automotive information Web site Edmunds.com.



3. Confusing the highway with a speedway



Even if it doesn't involve hard acceleration, speeding wastes gas. The faster you go, the more air your vehicle has to push out of the way. It's like moving your hand through water. The faster you try to move your hand, the harder the water pushes back.



In tests by Consumer Reports, driving at 75 miles per hour instead of 65 miles per hour reduced fuel economy by between 3 and 5 miles per gallon, depending on the vehicle.



4. Bumper-buzzing



Tailgating is a bad move for many reasons. First of all, it's unsafe. You reduce your ability to react if the car in front of you slows or stops. It also means you have to pay ultra-close attention to that car which reduces your ability to scan for other hazards ahead of you and to the sides.



And tailgating wastes gas. Every time the driver ahead taps his brakes, you have to slow down even more than he did. (That's because you can't react immediately so you have to slow even more because you're slowing down later.) Then you accelerate again to get back up to speed and resume your bumper-buzzing routine.



Hang back and you'll be safer - plus you'll be able to drive more smoothly and use less fuel. A good rule of thumb is to allow two seconds of space between your car and the one ahead. You can figure that out by counting off two seconds after the car in front of you passes an obvious landmark like an overpass.



5. Driving standing still



You've probably heard that it takes more gas to restart a car than to let it run. Maybe that used to be true, but it isn't anymore. With modern fuel-injection engines, it takes very little extra gas to restart a car once it's warmed up.



Idling, meanwhile, burns about a half-mile worth of gas every minute, according to the California Energy Commission. That's why hybrid cars shut down their gasoline engines whenever they stop, even for a moment.



Now you don't want to shut your engine down for every little stop in your regular, non-hybrid car - it's not designed for that - but if you're waiting for someone to run in and out of a convenience store, turn off the engine.



And don't go through the drive-through at fast food restaurants. You're already paying enough for the oil in those chicken nuggets.



Bonus tip: Don't idle your engine to let it warm up before driving. It does your engine no good and it wastes gas. Instead, start driving right away, but drive gently until the engine is warm.



6. Short hops



For really short trips, take advantage of the opportunity to get some exercise. Try walking to the store instead of driving. You can save gas and burn a few calories instead.



If you can't hoof it, save up your errands. A lot of short hops that let the engine cool down at home between trips can use twice as much gas as starting the car once and making a big sweep to all your stops, according to the U.S. Department of Energy.



Go to your farthest destination first so your engine has a chance to reach its optimal operating temperature. Then make your other stops on the way back. With the engine warmed up, the car will restart easily and run efficiently all the way home.
Is spinning cookies anywhere on here???
 

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Tailgating on a highway saves fuel but is too dangerous to consider.
The car in front of you is breaking the wind resistance for you so your car doesn't struggle as much to keep its speed, its the reason they do it in racing it gives them the edge so they can overtake.
 

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I'm guilty of a couple of these, especially 1 after getting in the Z from driving the Focus all week. I am not saying I "race" away at every green light but I do accelerate a lot more than I should :( Tailgating is one thing I DON'T do though.

I have been wanting to walk to the store here and there but the weather in my area has been so unpredictable lately. Not to mention heat index 105 with 100% humidity. *sigh*
 

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I am guilty of all of them except for bumper buzzing. I do bumper buzz very rarely when I am very late and there is someone going 40km/h in a 60 zone or something retarded like that.
 

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Item 1, Racing away from green lights, may get you some arguments. The following is from a Road and Track article titled "An enthusiast's guide to saving fuel" by Dennis Simanaitis, Engineering Editor.

"WOT/Short-Shifting
Remember Coach Grimbly’s dictum about “driving with an egg under your foot”? Forget it. The most efficient way to reach cruising speed is wide-open-throttle (WOT) short-shifting. That is, not only do revs cost money, but so does prolonged motoring in lower gears, when throttling and pumping losses are their greatest.

WOT/short-shifting can save as much as 20 percent in city driving, worst to best case. In actual practice, rarely does traffic allow full WOT, but it’s certainly fun — and efficient as well — to accelerate briskly through the lower gears to whatever the ambient speed happens to be."



Also, coasting to a near stop in a high gear means very low RPMs, which actually uses fuel. According to the service manual, fuel is cut when RPM is above 1800 and there is no load on the engine (foot off the gas pedal). Fuel flow begins again when RPM drops to 1500 to prevent a sub-idle condition.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
QUOTE
Also, coasting to a near stop in a high gear means very low RPMs, which actually uses fuel. According to the service manual, fuel is cut when RPM is above 1800 and there is no load on the engine (foot off the gas pedal). Fuel flow begins again when RPM drops to 1500 to prevent a sub-idle condition.

Is there any way you could possibly show me that in writing? Is it Z-specific or common to all cars? I'd like to know, thanks.
 

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For information on when fuel is cut off, look in the EC.pdf section of the Service Manual under Fuel Cut Control.

Most all cars and fuel injected motorcycles do this, although the RPM numbers may be different. It's a good way for the manufacturers to increase fuel mileage during the test cycle. The boys on Car Talk on PBS even talked about this once. It isn't as effective with automatic transmissions because there is no direct connection between the engine and the wheels. If you coast down a hill with your foot off the gas in a car with a manual transmission, the wheel speed can keep the engine RPM above the fuel cut threshold, resulting in zero fuel consumption during the coast. With an automatic, engine RPM will quickly fall to idle and fuel will be used to maintain idle RPM.
 

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I have my doubts about the assertion that clutch in hurts your gas milage. Yes, fuel is needed to keep idle in neutral, but it can't possibly be much. On the other hand, you drastically extend the cruise distance when in neutral. In my Miata I've come pretty close to a mile a couple time, I can't do that with the clutch engaged. The reality is that every unit of gasoline contains so much energy, whether you spend it initially (keeping revs up longer to lift off the gas later), or through the process (cruising at neutral), my suspicion is that you use almost the exact same amount (if I get really bored later, I'll come up with an energy balance).

I believe someone on another site saw gains by using the throttle like an on/off switch at WOT/full closed, and saw gains, but I didn't read to much of the post.

~Pat
 

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QUOTE (NoZYet @ Apr 2 2009, 09:58 AM) index.php?act=findpost&pid=572592
I have my doubts about the assertion that clutch in hurts your gas milage. Yes, fuel is needed to keep idle in neutral, but it can't possibly be much. On the other hand, you drastically extend the cruise distance when in neutral. In my Miata I've come pretty close to a mile a couple time, I can't do that with the clutch engaged. The reality is that every unit of gasoline contains so much energy, whether you spend it initially (keeping revs up longer to lift off the gas later), or through the process (cruising at neutral), my suspicion is that you use almost the exact same amount (if I get really bored later, I'll come up with an energy balance).

I believe someone on another site saw gains by using the throttle like an on/off switch at WOT/full closed, and saw gains, but I didn't read to much of the post.

~Pat
I would expect that the only time clutch out would come out on top is the example I gave - a downhill coast where speed is kept up by gravity. I would agree that, on a level stretch of road, coasting clutch in or in neutral would save more gas.
 
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