6 Ways you may be WASTING GAS. - Page 2 - Nissan 350Z Forum, Nissan 370Z Tech Forums
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post #11 of 25 (permalink) Old 06-09-2008, 05:59 PM Thread Starter
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No, cutting donuts actually add MPG.
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post #12 of 25 (permalink) Old 07-09-2008, 12:54 AM
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Tailgating on a highway saves fuel but is too dangerous to consider.
The car in front of you is breaking the wind resistance for you so your car doesn't struggle as much to keep its speed, its the reason they do it in racing it gives them the edge so they can overtake.
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post #13 of 25 (permalink) Old 07-09-2008, 10:02 PM
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I'm guilty of a couple of these, especially 1 after getting in the Z from driving the Focus all week. I am not saying I "race" away at every green light but I do accelerate a lot more than I should :( Tailgating is one thing I DON'T do though.

I have been wanting to walk to the store here and there but the weather in my area has been so unpredictable lately. Not to mention heat index 105 with 100% humidity. *sigh*


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post #14 of 25 (permalink) Old 04-01-2009, 05:31 PM
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I am guilty of all of them except for bumper buzzing. I do bumper buzz very rarely when I am very late and there is someone going 40km/h in a 60 zone or something retarded like that.
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post #15 of 25 (permalink) Old 04-01-2009, 06:43 PM
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Item 1, Racing away from green lights, may get you some arguments. The following is from a Road and Track article titled "An enthusiast's guide to saving fuel" by Dennis Simanaitis, Engineering Editor.

"WOT/Short-Shifting
Remember Coach Grimbly’s dictum about “driving with an egg under your foot”? Forget it. The most efficient way to reach cruising speed is wide-open-throttle (WOT) short-shifting. That is, not only do revs cost money, but so does prolonged motoring in lower gears, when throttling and pumping losses are their greatest.

WOT/short-shifting can save as much as 20 percent in city driving, worst to best case. In actual practice, rarely does traffic allow full WOT, but it’s certainly fun — and efficient as well — to accelerate briskly through the lower gears to whatever the ambient speed happens to be."



Also, coasting to a near stop in a high gear means very low RPMs, which actually uses fuel. According to the service manual, fuel is cut when RPM is above 1800 and there is no load on the engine (foot off the gas pedal). Fuel flow begins again when RPM drops to 1500 to prevent a sub-idle condition.

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post #16 of 25 (permalink) Old 04-01-2009, 11:47 PM Thread Starter
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Also, coasting to a near stop in a high gear means very low RPMs, which actually uses fuel. According to the service manual, fuel is cut when RPM is above 1800 and there is no load on the engine (foot off the gas pedal). Fuel flow begins again when RPM drops to 1500 to prevent a sub-idle condition.

Is there any way you could possibly show me that in writing? Is it Z-specific or common to all cars? I'd like to know, thanks.
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post #17 of 25 (permalink) Old 04-02-2009, 12:14 AM
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We should submit this to Mythbusters. I'd be curious as well.


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post #18 of 25 (permalink) Old 04-02-2009, 07:14 AM
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For information on when fuel is cut off, look in the EC.pdf section of the Service Manual under Fuel Cut Control.

Most all cars and fuel injected motorcycles do this, although the RPM numbers may be different. It's a good way for the manufacturers to increase fuel mileage during the test cycle. The boys on Car Talk on PBS even talked about this once. It isn't as effective with automatic transmissions because there is no direct connection between the engine and the wheels. If you coast down a hill with your foot off the gas in a car with a manual transmission, the wheel speed can keep the engine RPM above the fuel cut threshold, resulting in zero fuel consumption during the coast. With an automatic, engine RPM will quickly fall to idle and fuel will be used to maintain idle RPM.

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post #19 of 25 (permalink) Old 04-02-2009, 11:58 AM
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I have my doubts about the assertion that clutch in hurts your gas milage. Yes, fuel is needed to keep idle in neutral, but it can't possibly be much. On the other hand, you drastically extend the cruise distance when in neutral. In my Miata I've come pretty close to a mile a couple time, I can't do that with the clutch engaged. The reality is that every unit of gasoline contains so much energy, whether you spend it initially (keeping revs up longer to lift off the gas later), or through the process (cruising at neutral), my suspicion is that you use almost the exact same amount (if I get really bored later, I'll come up with an energy balance).

I believe someone on another site saw gains by using the throttle like an on/off switch at WOT/full closed, and saw gains, but I didn't read to much of the post.

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post #20 of 25 (permalink) Old 04-02-2009, 02:32 PM
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QUOTE (NoZYet @ Apr 2 2009, 09:58 AM)
Quote:
I have my doubts about the assertion that clutch in hurts your gas milage. Yes, fuel is needed to keep idle in neutral, but it can't possibly be much. On the other hand, you drastically extend the cruise distance when in neutral. In my Miata I've come pretty close to a mile a couple time, I can't do that with the clutch engaged. The reality is that every unit of gasoline contains so much energy, whether you spend it initially (keeping revs up longer to lift off the gas later), or through the process (cruising at neutral), my suspicion is that you use almost the exact same amount (if I get really bored later, I'll come up with an energy balance).

I believe someone on another site saw gains by using the throttle like an on/off switch at WOT/full closed, and saw gains, but I didn't read to much of the post.

~Pat
I would expect that the only time clutch out would come out on top is the example I gave - a downhill coast where speed is kept up by gravity. I would agree that, on a level stretch of road, coasting clutch in or in neutral would save more gas.

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